What Happens to Software Under Arbitrary Deadlines?

There are four basic engineering aspects to developing a software system: Requirements, Test, Design, and Implementation. When a project is squeezed for time, it is the Design and Test aspects that get squeezed to make room for Implementation. Design activities are in effect frozen, which means that the design of the system will stay static even as new features are added. Testing simply stops, with all that that implies.

As implementation continues, new requirements are uncovered or areas of existing requirements are discovered to need modification or clarification. All of these factors imply necessary changes to the design of the system, but since design is frozen, the necessary changes don’t happen. Since testing isn’t happening, the full ramifications of this fact are not immediately felt.

The only remaining implementation choice is to squeeze square pegs of new features into the round holes of the existing design. This option requires more time to implement because time is spent creating overhead to deal with the dissonance between the design and the requirements. The resulting code is harder to understand because of the extra overhead. This option is more prone to error because more code exists than should be necessary to accomplish the task. Every additional line of code is a new opportunity for a bug.

All of these factors results in code that is harder to maintain over time. New features are difficult to implement because they will require the same kind of glue-code to marry a poor design to the new requirements. Further, each new feature deepens the dependency of the system on the poor design, making it harder to correct, and making it ever-easier to continue throwing bad code after bad. When considered in isolation, it will always seem cheaper to just add crap-code to get the new feature in rather than correct the design, but cumulatively, it costs much more. Eventually it will kill the project.

As bad as all this is, the problems don’t stop there. As long as the ill-designed code continues to exist in the system it serves to undermine the existing and all future features in two ways. 1) It becomes a pain point around which ever more glue-code will have to be written as the interaction of the ill-designed feature with the rest of the system changes. 2) it acts as a precedent in the code-base, demonstrating that low-quality code is acceptable so long as the developer can find a reason to rationalize it.

Leave a Reply